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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I think the most important idea is to remember that there have been times throughout American history where what is right is not the same as what is legal. Sometimes to do the right thing you have to break a law. And the key there is in terms of civil disobedience. You have to make sure that what you are risking, what you are bringing onto yourself doesn't serve as a detriment to anybody else, it doesn't hurt anybody else. And if you’re volunteering yourself to be used as a negative example, to spend a lifetime in prison rather than to spend a time in prison -- a short period where you will come out, you’ll advocate, you’ll emerge stronger and be able to inspire other people to resist these policies, are you doing good or are you doing bad?
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I don't think there has ever been any question that I would like to go home. I mean, from day one I have said I'm doing this to serve my country. I'm still working for the government. Now whether amnesty or clemency becomes a possibility is not for me to say. That's a debate for the public and the government to decide. But if I could go anywhere in the world, that place would be home.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: It's really frustrating for someone who is working so hard to expand the domain of our rights and our privacy to end up stuck in a place where those rights are being challenged in ways that I would consider deeply unfair. The recent bloggers' registration law in Russia, I can't think of any basis for a law like that. Not just in Russia, but any country. The government shouldn't be regulating the operations of a free press whether it’s NBC or some blogger in their living room. There’s so much that needs to be defended here in Russia, but I am limited by my inability to speak Russian and so on and so forth, that it's an isolating and frustrating thing.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I really hope that Russia, the United States and many other countries will work to push back against this constantly increasing surveillance, against this constant erosion and abrasion of public rights.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Williams: The arc of your life is you went from signing up for the military of after 9/11, in effect saying you were willing to die for your country to then telling people you half expected to die via abduction or assassination after what you have done in this instance. That's a pretty dramatic arc since 2003, 2004. Snowden: I think that's actually a solid representation of the dramatic arcs that have happened within our government in the same period. Do you think our nation has changed since 9/11? Have the policies changed? Has the manner of our government changed? Has civil engagement with the government changed? Have our politics changed? Are things radically different in terms of partisanship? There have been radical changes within our government.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Williams: Do you see yourself as a patriot? Snowden: I do. You know, I think patriot is a word that's thrown around so much that it can be devalued nowadays. But being a patriot doesn't mean prioritizing service to government above all else. Being a patriot means knowing when to protect your country, knowing when to protect your constitution, knowing when to protect your countrymen from the violations of and encroachments of adversaries and those adversaries don't have to be foreign countries. They can be bad policies. They can be officials who, you know, need a little bit more accountability. They can be mistakes of government and simple overreach and things that should never have been tried or that went wrong.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Williams: Did you say earlier you were still serving your government? Snowden: Yes. Williams: How so? Snowden: When you look at the actions that I‘ve taken, when you look at the carefulness of the programs that have been disclosed, when you look at the way this has been filtered through the most trusted journalistic institutions in America, When you look at the way the government has had a chance to chime in on this and to make their case, and when you look at the changes that it's resulted in
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: When you look at the changes that it's resulted in, we have had the first open federal court to ever review these programs declare it likely unconstitutional and Orwellian and you see congress agreeing that massive surveillance, bulk collection needs to end. With all of these things happening that the government agrees all the way up to the President, again, make us stronger how can it be said that I did not serve my government? How can it be said that this harmed the country when all three branches of government have made reforms as a result of it.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Snowden: I have no relationship with the Russian government at all. I have never met the Russian president. I'm not supported by the Russian government. I'm not taking money from the Russian government. I'm not a spy which is the real question. The best way to make sure, for example, the Russians can't break my fingers and compromise information or hit me with a bag of money until I give them something was not to have it at all. And the way to do it was by destroying material that I was holding before I transited through Russia.
Edward Snowden
whistleblower
KNTV 05/28/2014
Williams: What do you miss about home? Snowden: I think the only -- the only answer to something like that for somebody in my situation is, you know, what don't I miss? What would you miss? What wouldn't you miss? I miss my family. I miss my home. I miss my colleagues. I miss the work. Because caught up in all these issues, people have unfairly demonized the NSA to a point that's too extreme. These are good people trying to do hard work for good reasons.
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